Camp Fire

PROJECTS

Jonathan's installations range from small pieces of wearable art to larger, public art installations.  His most notable work includes traditional Wampanoag architecture and maritime vessels.  These projects are intended to not only promote the visibility of Wampanoag people, but are meant to be community driven projects where Jonathan shares the knowledge and skillset of weetyu (house) and muhsh8n (boat) construction with the next generation of Wampanoag builders.

In 2017, Jonathan received the First People's Fund Jennifer Easton Community Spirit Award for his work in maintaining and revitalizing traditional muhsh8n making.

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01

Another Crossing: Artists Revisit the Mayflower Voyage

Currently on display at the Fuller Craft Museum through October 2021, Jonathan Perry created a mush8n (pronounced 'mishoon') or boat, exclusively using 17th century technology.  His work, curated by Glenn Adamson is displayed alongside a number of contemporary artists in the gallery.  This muhsh8n was created in the land of Patuxet.

02

Nolumbeka Muhsh8n Paddle

This muhsh8n was created for the Nolumbeka Project's Pocumtuck Homelands Festival.  It was the first muhsh8n to be paddled in the Connecticut River in well over 150 years.  Made of white pine, this muhs8n was created in Pocumtuck territory.

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03

Aquinnah x Hōkūle'a

Made in Jonathan's homeland of Aquinnah, this muhsh8n was created as a community learning project where Jonathan shared his knowledge in muhsh8n making with his community members.  This vessel was paddled in Vineyard Sound to welcome the Hōkūle'a, the Hawaiian voyaging vessel to Noepe (Martha's Vineyard) in an act of Indigenous diplomacy.

04

Mission Mishoon at the Mashantucket Pequot Museum & Research Center

Created in the homelands of the Mashantucket Pequot People, this muhsh8n, Nookoomuhs is made of white pine and was an intertribal effort led under the direction of Jonathan Perry.  Over 36' in length, it is the largest complete muhsh8n to date since the 1700s.